Humans of Northwood: Kyumin Shin ’22

“From I young age my passion has always been football. Being born in Seoul, South Korea I had the environment and opportunity to play high level football and play for good teams. Besides for sports I enjoy certain academics like science and mathematics. As a post Graduate student, I chose to come to Northwood after I learned about the Black Rock soccer program and met Coach Moodey. He did a great job explaining how attending Northwood could help me achieve my goals of becoming a Division I student-athlete. In my free time I like to sing and participate in the open mics offered at the Hub on Main Street.”

As told to Colter Cheney-Seymour ’22

Humans of Northwood: Suhaib Hussein Ali ’22

I’m from Somaliland, it’s a country in East Africa. A lot of people confuse it as Somalia but the countries divided in 1991 as an independent state. Even though we come from similar backgrounds, ethnicity, language, religion, it’s a totally different country.

Where I’m from the culture and lifestyle are vastly different. In Somaliland, the popular traditions we have are pottery, music, wood carving, and architectural things. A lot of our arts and traditions are based on pre-Islamic mythology and Muslim beliefs.

Something that is completely different in Somaliland that may be a shock to many people is the number of siblings in a family, in our country the household is much large than the average US family. I have 9 siblings, and I am the youngest. Living in a house with 9 siblings can be a challenge sometimes as you can imagine, but it’s something normal where I’m from. And it was shocking for me when I came here because most people would have 1 or 2 siblings; sometimes not even any.

There has been a lot of cultural shocks coming here. For example, my first time experiencing snow. It wasn’t pleasant but I’ve gotten used to it. But moving here was great I was able to learn another language which is something I am really passionate about. Currently, I speak 4 languages, Arabic, English, Somali, and Hindi.

I moved to the United States and Northwood School so I could pursue my education and maximize my opportunities. I for sure miss my home, but experiencing a different culture and new lifestyle has been a good experience for me. I plan to attend college here in the US but I am excited to finally go see my family back in Somaliland during the summer.

As told to Jacob Shain ’22. Photo provided.

“Don’t Let Up:” Biesemeyer Encourages at School Meeting Talk 

Director of Alpine Skiing Tommy Biesemeyer (Photo: World Cup Dreams Foundation)

There may be no person who better understands our school’s 2021-22 theme of Resilience than Tommy Biesemeyer, Director of Alpine Skiing. Biesemeyer shared the adversity he faced how he persevered at school meeting on Monday, November 1.

“Don’t let up,” shared the 12-year veteran of the U.S. Ski team, who came back from numerous “career-ending” injuries. Biesemeyer’s list of injuries include, 3 broken hands, a broken jaw, herniated disc, torn lateral and medial meniscus, ACL and MCL (in his left knee), torn ACL and medial meniscus as well as a patella tendon rupture (in his right knee), Achilles’ tendon rupture, post-surgical Achilles’ tendon staph infection, and a broken shoulder. 

Some of his injuries had the worst possible timing. His Achilles’ tendon rupture occurred during the downhill training run, just days before he was supposed to compete in the Olympics. His motto of “don’t let up” helped him persevere through these setbacks.

Biesemeyer announced his retirement from the World Cup during the fall of 2020. Retirement doesn’t mean he’s lost his competitiveness, though. Several months after announcing his retirement Biesemeyer competed in US Nationals, and won his first U.S. National Downhill title. “Don’t take life too seriously,” he said in an Instagram post after his win. 

“As time goes on, it’s easier to reflect on my ski career because it is my own story, and I think kids deserve to know the importance that there’s no one way to be successful.” 

Humans of Northwood: Ms. Katie MacCuaig 

I’ve played hockey my whole life. When I was 15 I moved away from home in Massena NY to play on a travel team in New Hampshire. I was there for my sophomore, junior, and senior years. From there I got recruited, and I played hockey there at Holy Cross for four years. I was a political science major. I didn’t really know what to do after graduating college. All I had done my whole life was play hockey. I had never thought about what I wanted to do after. I was looking for jobs throughout the summer, and nothing was really clicking with me. I didn’t really want a 9-5 job because I had been an athlete my whole life. I was used to being busy all the time. At the end of the summer, [Northwood Athletic Director] Trevor Gilligan reached out to me about an opportunity to coach at Northwood. I also teach now too. It’s really nice to coach kids who have the same goals and aspirations that I did. It’s nice to be able to connect with them because I recently went through what they’re going through. We relate on the same topics. Even with other sports like skiing and soccer, it’s cool to be around kids who have similar goals.

As told to Leah DeFilippo ’22 (Photo provided) 

Humans of Northwood: Cilla Nee ’22 

When I was a second year U16 we had a speed [Super G] series at Burke. Pretty much every U16 girl went to this series, and Burke was hosting a training camp on the track that we would be skiing a few days before the races. The U16 girls decided not to do the training camp. This was a bit of a mistake. We weren’t sure what we were getting into. 

There’s this one jump at Burke. It’s called pavilion. Pavilion is fine-if you prepare for the jump correctly. But if you don’t prepare for pavilion correctly, then you’re either getting sent into the B-Net to the right, or getting tons of air right onto the pitch. We had like a 50% chance of us doing this jump right. I love the 04s/05s, but we were screwed. 

Race day came and there was a foot of snow on the ground, the wind was shaking the chairlift, and the race was put on hold. We were all a bit anxious, as extra snow for speed events can make things more dangerous. It was also really hard to see, the light was flat and dark. Somehow, the course was set, and we went up to slip. Course maintenance had us to tip to tail slips, but the snow was just not going anywhere. We did around three slip runs before we were told to head inside. 

I can’t remember who, but someone had an Uno deck in their boot bag. The NYSEF girls started playing and slowly more and more Vermont girls joined in on our game. Eventually we had pretty much everyone racing that day playing a huge game of Uno. I’m pretty sure US Ski Team Member Zoey Zimmerman, who was at the race, even played.

Eventually our coach came in, sat down, and started talking to us. We asked him if the race was canceled and he was like “I don’t know. It could be.” Five minutes later the race director came into the lodge and said the race was cancelled. 

The next day is just as hectic, it was -18 degrees. You couldn’t have any skin exposed or you would get frost bite within a matter of seconds. We put tape on our faces to try to protect out skin, but it wasn’t working. 

It’s time for the U16 girls to go, and we’re terrified. We all make it down ok, but everyone did pretty bad. Our usual speed queens were around six seconds out, and the rest of us are close to last, or just last. But at the end of the day it was a good experience.

Photos from that race:

 

 

 

 

 

As told to Leah DeFilippo ’22. Photo of Cilla by Mr. Michael Aldridge. Race photos provided.

Humans of Northwood: Minh-Khoi “Kirk” NguyenLe ’23


One of the most important lessons I have learned throughout my experience outdoors is, “Use the bathroom when you can, even if you don’t have to go.”  

Out of all my hikes and climbs, I have this one really funny story from a backpacking trip with my friends. We were hiking above the tree line, ridge walking, and we get to the peak of the highest mountain in the area and there’s this massive observatory with clean bathrooms, food, and everything. After we were done there, we got ready to go back down to the campsite. Along the way back, about a mile away from the tree line, we saw a storm approaching us. 

My friend goes, “Oh no I got to go to the bathroom right now.” Like seriously? We were just at the observatory. When you’re below the tree line it’s relatively easy to do your business, you just dig a hole, do your business, then cover the hole. When you are above the tree line, oh my god, that’s a different story.

My friend found a solution that involved making a deposit into a little plastic bag. I don’t know if I should say the rest. 

As told to Jacob Shain ’22 (Photo: Provided)

Humans of Northwood: Calem Tommy ‘22 

“I came to Northwood from Cape Town; South Africa to pursue my career as a student athlete. I know Northwood can help me develop me and I see it as the perfect balance between sports and academics. Something I really like about Northwood is the diversity throughout the school. It makes for a very interesting dynamic and opens me up to new cultures and ideas.  

“I have played soccer from a young age, but I began to take it seriously when I was 9 years old when I took part in my first match. 

“One aspect of Northwood that I consider to be negative is how far from home I am. When I’m not on the pitch, I enjoy listening to music and going to the beach with my friends. I plan to continue being a student-athlete at a top college with a successful soccer program where I hope to study business management or sports science.”

As told to Colter Cheney-Seymour ’22. Photo: Mr. Michael Aldridge.

Humans of Northwood: Mr. Benjamin LeBlanc 

Mr. LeBlanc is the new physics and precalculus teacher. 

Mr. Ben LeBlanc (Photo provided)

“I love physics because I had an interactive physics teacher who embraced his uniqueness and explained the concepts thoroughly and inspired me. Physics and math have always been a strong suit and I have found a great interest in them for their structure despite not having the ability to find a solution but rather a different view of your surroundings. Another inspiration of mine was my older brother, who balanced athletics and academics and was a guide in helping me get my PhD and becoming a teacher.  

“At Northwood, I’ve appreciated having more interconnections as a teacher rather than in the engineering field. It’s amazing the interaction you have with students throughout their entire schooling life, not just in their classes, but at lunch, at study hall or in their living areas, you see a different side of them throughout the scope of their day.  

“A talent of mine is that I’m very good at not getting fatigued during hiking, biking or running. A fun fact is that the longest distance I’ve ever ran was 44 miles. I have an interest in the physics of running, I’ve specifically focused on determining if I could find or quantify fatigue in running without actually measuring parameters. I conducted a study that can estimate fatigue in somebody doing a tiring sport, which minimizes injury while performing at the highest level.  

“My goal is to have kids of my own and continue teaching science as well as to encouraging kids to pursue physics and to help set children up for life in areas of study such as engineering. I would like to lay the fundamentals down for students and make them passionate about it.  

“A more personal goal of mine is the’ Fastest Known Times’ which is a speed record on any given route. I like the freedom of it, the ability to hike in new places and meet new people. My ideal weekend day is going on an early morning run or hike and relaxing the rest of the day with movies or playing games and then ending with a campfire. At school, I really enjoy eating tacos and fajitas, they are hands down some of my favorite foods. I love eating pizza and ice cream, especially on weekends.”

As told to Christie-Ann Nelson ’23

Humans of Northwood: Raychel Germaine

“I was born in Phoenix Arizona. I moved away when I was two. I moved about thirteen times before I was the age of thirteen. I lived in Germany, the East coast, West coast, North, South, all of it.

I grew up playing soccer, and I was in competitive soccer until I was fourteen when I decided to try out for luge. My dad was on the luge team in the late 80s and early 90s. I came up to Lake Placid from Georgia to try out. I was told that I was too old and too small to make the team. I fought this decision and asked for the summer to prove myself. I  went through physical testing and made the team.

Germaine on the podium at a Luge World Cup event. (Photo provided)

I started competing internationally in 2011, I made the youth Olympic Games in 2012 in Innsbruck Austria. After that I made the Junior National Team and competed internationally on the Junior World Cup circuit from 2012-2015 and in 2015 I became the Junior National Champion. I then made the Senior National Team, raced World Cups, and got top tens in a few races. 

I tore my shoulder in 2015 and got shoulder surgery. This put me back a lot, I went from being extremely strong and happy about how I was with sliding, to not even being able to put my hair up for a few months. I ended up making the World Cup team that year and World Champs. I was really happy and proud of myself that I was able to go from my lowest times to my highest. 

In 2018 I competed for a spot on the Olympic team, but I didn’t make it, and it was one of the hardest years of my life. I thought about quitting but I decided to compete again. I had a really good year competing that year, and was proud of myself for bringing myself up from the bottom to the top. I think a lot of people experience that in their athletic career. You can’t ride the high forever.

Ms. Raychel Germaine is the Director of Ski Operations for Northwood School.

As told to Leah DeFilippo ‘22. Photos provided.

 

 

Third Trimester Honor Rolls Announced

June 29, 2021 — Ms. Noel Carmichael, Northwood School’s Dean of Academic Affairs, today announced the Honor Rolls for the third trimester of the 2020-21 school year, which concluded on Thursday, May 20.

 

DEAN’S LIST

Upperclassmen (Gr. 11 & 12): Minimum weighted GPA of 4.00 with no grade below B+

Underclassmen (Gr. 9 & 10): Minimum weighted GPA of 3.70 with no grade below B+

Brady, Amelia ‘21

Brady, Brian ‘24

Broderick, Kate ‘22

Castillo, Angie ‘21

Cielo, Ryan ‘21

Clark, Jillian ‘23

Colby, Ellie ‘21

Cote, Gabby ‘21

Cruickshank, Will ‘21

Day, Ava ‘21

De Angelis, Connor ‘22

Donatello, Drew ‘24

Donatello, Haley ‘21

Donato, Will ‘21

Doyle, Liam ‘22

Eisenhart, Macie ‘23

Goldberg, Emma ‘23

Green, Sebastian ‘22

Guevara, Ashley ‘24

Hall, Carson ‘22

Harrison, Caroline ‘22

Higgins-Lopez, Audrey ‘21

Jackson, Turner Wells ‘23

Jaslow, Jacob ‘23

Kelley, Brooke ‘23

Kidd, Lealani ‘21

Kis, Colin ‘24

Klebba, Jadenlin ‘21

Korec, Jan ‘22

Kroes, Lars ‘21

Larsen, Hilary ‘22

Lawrence, Madison ‘23

Lee, Junyeop ‘23

Loescher, Elise ‘21

Martin, Anja ‘22

Moores, Seth ‘24

Nee, Cilla ‘22

Nelson, Amanda ‘23

Nelson, Christie-Ann ‘23

Norfolk, Lincoln ‘24

Norfolk, Rowen ‘22

Ormiston, Chase ‘21

Renner, Robert ‘21

Sanchez Korenfeld, Joaquin ‘21

Schupp, Sophia ‘24

Sinclair, Abby ‘23

Tebo, Adria‘23

Tsang, Jeremy ‘23

Volpe, Ricky ‘23

Winthrop, Joey ‘23

 

HIGH HONOR ROLL

Upperclassmen (Gr. 11 & 12): Minimum weighted GPA of 3.70 with no grade below B

Underclassmen (Gr. 9 & 10): Minimum weighted GPA of 3.30 with no grade below B

Alvarez, Marina ‘21

Belisle, Kaiya ‘21

Boudreau, Tyler ‘22

Brady, Matthew ‘22

Brito, Omiel ‘21

Cielo, Johnny ‘21

Cramer, Meg ‘21

Crane, Maisie ‘23

Dawood, Nora ‘23

DeGirolamo, Ben ‘21

DeGuardia, Dominick ‘24

DelliQuadri, Peppi ‘22

Fitzsimmons, Nora ‘24

Frantz, Tate ‘23

Fust, Ray ‘21

Hagness, Kate ‘21

Jones, Bryan ‘22

Lasky, Aidan ‘22

Lewin, Ruby ‘22

Lluberes, Jazlyn ‘23

Loffredo, Slater ‘22

Maiore, Ruby ‘22

Melicant, Paige ‘22

 

Mikula, Luc ‘21

Mutunga, Keith ‘21

Nolet-Gagne, Mathis ‘23

Purcell, Caroline ‘24

Scheine, Austin ‘21

Sheridan, Evie ‘22

Spiegel, Lily ‘22

Swanson, Adeline ‘24

Tuffy, Ainsley ’24

Wentzel, Kara ‘22

Wilson, Kennedy ‘22

 

 

HONOR ROLL

Upperclassmen (Gr. 11 & 12): Minimum GPA of 3.30 with no grade below B-

Underclassmen (Gr. 9 & 10): Minimum GPA of 3.00 with no grade below B-

Ali, Suhaib ‘22

Basden, Kendin ‘22

Butler, Sierra ‘21

Caloro, Benedetta ‘21

Castillo, Addie ‘21

Cleaveland, Cody ‘23

Cook, Kira ‘23

DeFilippo, Leah ‘22

Fesette, Ella ‘22

Guèvin, Jacob ‘21

Harris, Jordan ‘21

Hildreth, Brady ‘22

Hollister, Karleigh ‘22

Jean -Francois, Eli ‘21

Kgwakgwa, Sean ‘21

Kirschenbaum, Nathan ‘21

Leone, Michael ‘21

Mathews, Cole ‘23

Mazza, Andrew ‘21

McGrath, Ashlyn ‘21

Merriman, Brendan ‘21

Neme Filho, Calil ‘21

NguyenLe, Kirk ‘23

Pavlasova, Anna ’23

Prince, Marie-Jeanne ‘22

Santay, Connor ‘22

Scheine, Austin ‘21

Smith, Luke ‘21

Tommy, Calem Luke ‘22

Tremblay-Kau, Johann ‘22

Wardlaw, Wyatt ‘24

Winicki, Roman ‘22

Woudenberg, Nolan ‘22

Zhang, Chloe ‘21

Zientko, Zachary ‘21

 

EFFORT HONOR ROLL

Attained at least three “excellent” grades, with no effort grades below “good.”

Ali, Suhaib ‘22

Alvarez, Marina ‘21

Belisle, Kaiya ‘21

Boudreau, Tyler ‘22

Brady, Amelia ‘21

Brady, Brian ‘24

Brito, Omiel ‘21

Broderick, Kate ‘22

Castillo, Addie ‘21

Castillo, Angie ‘21

Cielo, Ryan ‘21

Colby, Ellie ‘21

Cook, Kira ‘23

Cote, Gabby ‘21

Cramer, Meg ‘21

Crane, Maisie ‘23

Cruickshank, Will ‘21

Day, Ava ‘21

De Angelis, Connor ‘22

DeGirolamo, Ben ‘21

DelliQuadri, Peppi ‘22

Dempsey, Norah ‘21

Donatello, Drew ‘24

Donatello, Haley ‘21

Donato, Will ‘21

Doyle, Liam ‘22

Eisenhart, Macie ‘23

Fesette, Ella ‘25

Fust, Ray ‘21

Goldberg, Emma ‘23

Green, Sebastian ‘22

Guevara, Ashley ‘24

Guèvin, Jacob ‘21

Hagness, Kate ‘21

Hall, Carson ‘22

Harrison, Caroline ‘22

Higgins-Lopez, Audrey ‘21

Hollister, Karleigh ‘25

Jackson, Turner Wells ‘23

Jaslow, Jacob ‘23

Jones, Bryan ‘22

Kidd, Lealani ‘21

Kis, Colin ‘24

Klebba, Jadenlin ‘21

Korec, Jan ‘22

Kroes, Lars ‘21

Larsen, Hilary ‘22

Lasky, Aidan ‘22

Lawrence, Madison ‘23

Lee, Junyeop ‘23

Lluberes, Jazlyn ‘23

Loescher, Elise ‘21

Loffredo, Slater ‘22

Maiore, Ruby ‘22

Martin, Anja ‘22

McGrath, Ashlyn ‘21

Melicant, Paige ‘22

Merriman, Brendan ‘21

Mikula, Luc ‘21

Moores, Seth ‘24

Mutunga, Keith ‘21

Nee, Cilla ‘22

Neme Filho, Calil ‘21

Norfolk, Rowen ‘22

Oechsner, Maximilian ‘21

Ormiston, Chase ‘21

Purcell, Caroline ‘24

Renner, Robert ‘21

Samb, Abdou ‘21

Sanchez Korenfeld, Joaquin ‘21

Schupp, Sophia ‘24

Sinclair, Abby ‘23

Spiegel, Lily ‘22

Tebo, Adria‘23

Tommy, Calem Luke ‘22

Tremblay-Kau, Johann ‘22

Tsang, Jeremy ‘23

Valenzuela, Jazzy ‘21

Volpe, Ricky ‘23

Wentzel, Kara ‘22

Wilson, Kennedy ‘22

Winthrop, Joey ‘23

Woudenberg, Nolan ‘22

Zarcone, Natalie ‘22

Zhang, Chloe ‘21

Zientko, Zachary ‘21

 

 

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