10 Things You Might Not Know About Lake Placid

Welcome

The “Welcome to Lake Placid” signboard in front of the Lake Placid Horse Show Grounds (Photo: Whiteface Mountain)

1. Northwood is actually not in Lake Placid. Most of what we consider “Lake Placid” is actually not in the small lakeside village of Lake Placid, but rather in the surrounding town of North Elba. Northwood School’s property line is a few hundred yards outside the Village line. [Read more…]

Opinion: A Plan to Throw Hockey Pucks at Shooter is Better Than No Plan

On March 2, 2018, The Mirror published an editorial on gun violence and its effects on our nation. The article called for Northwood School to create a school safety plan in the event of an active shooter. It has been nearly 300 days, and there is still no plan. There have been no emergency drills — other than basic fire drills — in at least 5 years. In the drill more than five years ago, students ran into the surrounding woods upon hearing the victory bell ring. No current students have had an active shooter drill. [Read more…]

2nd Avenue in Blue Hill in Cape Town


canneryrowThe “Cannery Row Assignment” is a legendary writing exercise in Mr. Reed’s Advanced Composition and World Literature (Senior English) class. Here’s the prompt:

“After a careful examination of the opening pages of Cannery Row, choose a place you know well and describe it using the opening of the novel as a model. You should try for a sentence-by-sentence parallel to Steinbeck’s style. For example, when he writes, “Cannery Row in Monterey in California” you could write “Northwood School in Lake Placid in New York.” The idea is to carefully mimic Steinbeck. Find similar characters in your place to those Steinbeck mentions in Cannery Row.”

Every year he gets some outstanding work and one of the best pieces is published in The Mirror. This year, we loved senior Alex van Schalkwyk’s response, an intimate look at his hometown of Cape Town, South Africa.

2nd Avenue in Blue Hill in Cape Town is a novel, a war, a wreck, a stench, a prison, a playground, a reflection, a home. Lavender Hill is the old and dirty, glass and tin and plastic and broken concrete, cracked road and bottle caps and soggy cigarettes, crates of beer bottles with chipped edges, corner stores, game shops, and drug labs, and small busy markets, and burger stands and portable toilets. Its people are, as the boy exclaims, “gangsters, rapists, thieves and bastards,” for whom he meant everyone. Had the boy looked through a different lens he might have said “Mothers and fathers and teachers and honest people,” and would have meant the same thing.

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Lavender Hill in Cape Town, South Africa.

In the afternoon when the merchants give their orders, the drug dealers expand rapidly to street corners while whistling. Dirty hands drop off bags 10 meters away from where regular customers secretly pick them up. The process is strategically chosen, for if they were passed from hand to hand the bags, at least the ones sold to regular customers, would appear more obviously. Then gangsters’ whistles screech and all over town teenagers and children run home to safety. Then the brave make the corrupt thieves weary: police officers, vigilante, neighborhood watch who come disperse into the streets.

Then from town pour prostitutes and tramps and drug addicts, men, and women in ragged t-shirts and torn pants. They come running to steal and buy and sell the drugs. The whole street cries and grumbles and coughs and shakes while the bullets of their guns race out of chambers and the chambers empty as more bullets are released. The guns cry and grumble and cough until the last enemy is grazed and wounded and shattered and killed and then the whistles screech again and the dirty, vile, putrid prostitutes and tramps and drug addicts, men and women, stumble out and drag over the bridge into the town and 2nd Avenue becomes itself again – peaceful and safe. Its normal life returns. The young who hid away in fear in their small homes come out to play in the polluted playground in the common park. The boys from Cozy Corner come out for a bit of sun if there is any. The professor walks from the state university and crosses the street to Blue Bottles Pub for a few drinks. Chris the handyman scans like an eagle through his chaotic garage for a screw or a nail that he can use to put up a window. Then the sun starts to disappear and the street-lights turn on in front of Cozy Corner – the bulb which makes beams of luminous light in 2nd Avenue. Students arrive at the state university to see Professor, and he walks across the street for a few more drinks.

How can the novel and war and the wreck – the stench, the prison, the playground, and the reflection – be set down alive? When you catch insects there are certain spiders that are so alert that they are almost impossible to catch, for they scatter and spring at the sight of movement. You must let them creep and crawl of their own into your trap. And maybe that could be the way to write this novel – to open each passage by letting words crawl in by themselves.

Movember Raises Funds for Cancer Research

The boys and men of Northwood School have a distinctly scruffy look, as many of them have not shaved all month. It’s not mass civil disobedience in protest of the dress and grooming policies. November is “Movember” (a combination of “mustache” and “November”), which is also the name of the foundation whose goal is to raise awareness about a number of men’s health issues, including prostate cancer. [Read more…]

Community Responds to Pittsburgh Synagogue Shooting

It was just another Saturday for many at Northwood this past weekend.  Some took the ACT while others slept in or got up and had breakfast. Some were in the Boston area for a big hockey tournament, and others were gearing up for another weekend of exciting Black Rock FC soccer matches. [Read more…]

Mirror Poll: The Northwood Community Leans Left

On this election day in the United States, President Donald Trump and the Republicans have the support of less than twenty-five percent of the Northwood School community, while more than forty percent prefers Democrats and former President Barack Obama. Support for Trump and the Republicans equaled those who say they “Don’t know and/or don’t care.” [Read more…]

Northwood’s Take: The Brett Kavanaugh Story

A big discussion among people today is the issue of sexism, sexual harassment, and sexual assault. Opinions vary depending on the state you visit and the people you ask, but it is undeniable that the “#metoo movement” has shaped a national conversation.

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Kavanaugh and Ford testified before the Senate Judiciary Committee (Photo: NBC News).

[Read more…]

Death of Swedish Music Icon Avicii Shakes Students

The music industry received news of a devastating blow that also affected our school community. Swedish musician Tim Bergling, better known as Avicii, passed away last month at the age of 28. He was a worldwide icon with house music producing global hits like Wake Me Up and Levels. [Read more…]

Day of Silence Brings Awareness of the LGBTQ Community

Last Friday, Northwood School participated in a Day of Silence to bring awareness to the LGBTQ community. This is an annual event nationwide and was organized at Northwood by Addie Castillo ‘21 and Ben DeGirolamo ‘21 as part of a class in Mrs. Carmichael’s ninth grade English class.   [Read more…]

Students Walk Out to Protest Gun Violence

Last Friday at Northwood School, 29 students and 10 teachers walked out of class at 10:00 am to protest gun violence, especially school shootings. Students in over 2,000 schools around the country came together to walk out of classes and mark the anniversary of the 1999 Columbine school shooting, which is considered the beginning of the modern era of school shootings.

WalkOut

Seniors Hannah Kessel (left) and Olivia Skriloff face the assembled students and faculty at the walkout on April 20, 2018. (Photo: Sam DiBitetto ’18)

The walkout at Northwood began at 10:00 am, five minutes into C period classes. Students and teachers gathered in the indoor tennis courts at 10:00 am where they heard a few people speak and observed a moment of silence. Seventeen minutes later, at 10:17 am, they went back to class. The demonstration last seventeen minutes in memory of the seventeen people killed at the school shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Florida on February 14.

The walkout was led by seniors Hannah Kessel and Olivia Skriloff, and they both spoke at the tennis courts. Kessel read the mission of the national walkout:

National School Walkout is a movement powered and led by students across the country. We’re protesting congressional, state, and local failures to take action to prevent gun violence. America is the only country in the world where so many people are killed by guns, and yet our leaders do nothing about it. In many states, it’s more difficult to register to vote than it is to buy a rifle. Apparently to some politicians, a vote is scarier than a gun.

Skriloff read the names of the people killed in the Parkland and Columbine shootings. Skriloff also urged everyone in attendance to call their elected officials and urge them to enact sensible gun reform legislation. Click here to contact your legislators.

Every student who walked out seemed genuinely concerned about gun violence and moved by the event. “I think If we all came together we could put an end to gun violence,” said junior Barrett Ott.

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