How To Prevent And Treat Frostbite

frostbite-treatment-featured-image-1-750x420It may be the end of February, a month that saw the famous groundhog see his shadow indicating an early spring, but Lake Placid is still in the grips of winter. The Adirondacks is one of the coldest regions in the United States. Both locals and tourists enjoy outdoor activities here in Lake Placid even when it’s freezing. But spending many hours in the cold increases the risk of getting frostbite, which can not only interfere with your winter fun but also damage your body.

Frostbite is a condition in which the tissue below the skin freezes. Since humans are composed mainly of water, when exposed to cold for too long, cells that make up our skin tissues can actually freeze solid, leading to both pain and possibly permanent damage to the tissues.

Luckily, frostbite is easily recognizable. The skin first turns pink and then red. Once the tissue actually freezes, the skin turns white. If the frostbite is serious enough, it can even turn black, meaning that the skin tissue has actually died. If you think that you have frostbite, let your body warm up naturally. Never put warm or hot water on the area affected, as this will further damage the tissues.

However, frostbite can be avoided by simply wearing hats, gloves, scarves, and warm boots, as it usually occurs on areas of open skin, such as fingers, ears, necks, and on extremities.

Even though you may not look “cool” wearing layers, if you stay safe and warm, at the end of the day, you’ll be able to enjoy the winter of the Adirondacks longer.

Sections

Story Archive

The Mirror was established in 1927
© 2015-2019 by the Staff of The Mirror
The Mirror's Policy Manual and Style Guide.
The Mirror is funded by gifts to the Northwood Fund. Thank you.

%d bloggers like this: