Five Alumni Competing in PyeongChang Winter Games

Five Northwood School alumni will compete in the XXIII Winter Olympic Games in PyeongChang, South Korea. Two athletes, Andrew Weibrecht ’03 and Tony Granato ’83, are participating in their third Olympic Games, while Kevin Drury ’06, Mike Testwuide ’05, and Will Rhoads ’13 are first-time Olympians.

[Read more…]


How to Be Sustainable While Keeping Warm in Subzero Temps

As the winter season reaches its peak and temperatures drop below zero, the results of climate change become ever more prevalent. With extreme heat comes extreme cold, both of which often cause people to waste energy, worsening the crisis. This year, several temperature records in America, both high and low, have been broken, causing families to huddle in their homes with the thermostat turned up. Despite the extreme temperatures, there are several methods to stay warm while the world freezes around you. [Read more…]

Holiday Cheer at Northwood

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Northwood takes the holidays very seriously: we deck the halls and hold a celebratory formal dinner that culminates with Christmas carols and Santa sharing presents with faculty children. During the weeks leading up to the event, we decorated the living room with poinsettias, fairy lights, menorahs, and a Christmas tree, finished off with mistletoe over the entrance. Students baked and decorated cookies for the formal. The band and vocal classes worked tirelessly on their performances. Everyone was fully immersed in the holiday spirit when the time came for the winter formal. [Read more…]

Composting at Northwood: It’s Not Just Rotten Food

Northwood’s campus, though small, is embedded into the nature that surrounds it. We have three expansive fields, trees and grass surrounding the buildings, and an Adirondack pavilion. In order to tend to this greenery, we rely mainly on fertilizers bought from outside sources, which are quite expensive. There is a way to become self-sustainable so that the school does not have to spend money on fertilizer while reducing waste produced by our community: composting.


Students collect food waste from the kitchen in plastic buckets and bring it to the compost bin. Photo: provided.

Composting is a process by which organic waste such as food, leaves, or lawn clippings, decomposes in a controlled environment to produce compost, a soil-like material that is full of nutrients. For the waste to properly break down, it must be kept moist and aerated regularly to keep decomposition aerobic so the food does not simply rot in anaerobic fashion. It can be then used in gardens as a form of fertilizer to improve the quality of plants grown there. The most commonly used method has three stages, and three piles – one where the food goes in, one where it is mid – decomposition, and one for the end stages when it becomes usable. The decomposition takes anywhere from three months to a year, depending on conditions such as temperature and moisture. [Read more…]

How To Calculate Your GPA

With the first trimester ending, students are all excited for (or dreading) their grades. With this comes the question of GPAs. The GPA is an important tool to determine how well a student is doing academically. Many students, however, have no idea what a GPA is or how it is calculated.

“GPA” is an acronym for “Grade Point Average,” a tool to measure your average grade throughout all classes. The method Northwood uses is very simple, and it’s easy for students to find on their own. It takes the total points from the letter grades and averages them to find what is essentially the average grade. The letter/point correspondence works as seen below:

A   =  4.0
A-  =  3.7
B+ =  3.3
B   =  3.0
B-  =  2.7
C+ =  2.3
C   =  2.0
C-  =  1.7
D+ =  1.3
D   =  1
F   =   0

Northwood does not include A+ or D- in their grading scale. Any grade above a 97 is an A, and any grade below a 60 is an F, while 60 – 66.9 is a D.

In the case of Honors and AP courses, Northwood includes a “weighted” grading system. For an honors level class, 0.5 is added to the grade point, while for an AP class, 1.0 is added. For example, a B for a normal level class is 3.0, an honors class is 3.5, and an AP class is 4.0. Let’s take this hypothetical grade sheet:

Spanish III Honors Physics English 11 AP US History Pre-Calculus Guitar
A B A- C+ B- B+

To find the GPA, first convert them into their point values:

Spanish = 4.0
Honors physics = 3.0 + .5
English 11 = 3.7
AP US History = 2.3 + 1.0
Pre-Calculus = 2.7
Guitar = 3.3
Then add them together: 4.0 + 3.5 + 3.7 + 3.3 + 2.7 + 3.3 = 20.5
And divide by the number of classes (6): 20.5 / 6 = 3.416

Thus, the Grade Point Average is 3.416, or a high B+.

Not every school uses this exact method for the GPA. Some schools do not include art courses in the GPA calculation, and some do not count AP and Honors classes any higher than normal level classes. This, however, is how Northwood’s works, and now hopefully you can calculate it on your own.

Humans of Northwood: Ms. Aerie Treska


Ms. Treska with her son, Calder. (Photo: provided)

I teach Literary Themes. I am also the Eleventh Grade Dean and the co-advisor for CARE. This is my first year at Northwood. My dad [Mike Treska ‘64] fell in love with this school, this town, and especially the people, and I was lucky enough to grow up in Lake Placid. Before Northwood, I taught for four years at St. Paul’s School for Boys, then spent fourteen years at Roland Park Country School. I loved it there, but I was eager to work in a place where my boys [Owen, 14, Baxter, 12, and Calder, 7] could also benefit from the educational community into which I was pouring my time, heart, and soul. I returned to the Adirondacks with them every summer, and when we weren’t there, I felt so homesick for the mountains. Mr. Pierce and I had a long talk, then we e-mailed our friend, Jill Walker, to see if there might be any openings at Northwood. We were eager to rejoin this close-knit community that our children could also be a part of, and so we did. My colleagues are wonderful; they are creative and passionate about working and living in these mountains. I love teaching and interacting with students, but although I have learned to cultivate an extroverted personality, I am a hard-core introvert. By Friday night, I am sort of talked-out. I just really need time and space and silence so that I can tune in to my rich and restorative inner life. One thing about me that may surprise people is that I really like rap and hip hop (as long as it’s not racist or misogynistic), especially MIA, Eminem, the Beastie Boys, and old-school stuff like Grandmaster Flash, De La Soul, A Tribe Called Quest, and Run DMC. Really good rappers do amazing stuff with language; their use of cadence, internal rhyme, and double (even triple) entendre is virtuosic.

As told to Courtney Fairchild ’20

Plattsburgh-Bound Seniors Hope to Continue Dynasty

Three senior hockey players have announced their plans to attend SUNY Plattsburgh and play for the most dominant team in Division III hockey. The Cardinals have won a total of six NCAA Division III women’s ice hockey championships, seven ECAC Women’s West Championship titles, and have won at least 20 games in each of the past fifteen seasons. It’s one of the most impressive dynasties in the history of college hockey.

According to the blog D3 Recruiting Hub, at the Division III level, “committing” is an informal and non-binding statement by the student-athlete that she intends to apply and, if admitted, matriculate at the college and participate in intercollegiate athletics. Committing does not guarantee admission to the college nor does it guarantee playing time.

Ashley Davis, Hanna Rose, and Sierra Benjamin have chosen SUNY Plattsburgh, the hockey power and small state school an hour from Lake Placid on Lake Champlain. The Mirror staff writer Courtney Fairchild ’20 sat down with the trio to ask them a few questions about being committed to a college, and what it’s like to do so with some close friends at their side. [Read more…]

An Investigation Into Recycling Culture at Northwood

One of Northwood’s most attractive features is the beautiful land that surrounds it. We lay in the Adirondack Park just off the shores of Mirror Lake and Lake Placid, surrounded by luscious forests of evergreen and deciduous trees. It’s no surprise people flock from all places to hike the gorgeous mountains and swim in the lakes, as they are truly a gem of the natural world. The experience students receive from Northwood’s Adirondack setting demands that we should be a standout leader in sustainability, so one would expect us to emphasize preservation of the beautiful environment we reside in. [Read more…]

The Mirror was established in 1927
© 2015 by the Staff of The Mirror
The Mirror is funded by gifts to the Northwood Fund. Thank you.

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