Humans of Northwood: Imani Hawman ‘20

imani

My hometown is Newton, CT, but I’m so grateful to have called Lake Placid my home for four years.

I originally chose Northwood just for the ski program. But throughout my years at the school, I realized that Northwood has so much more to offer! While at Northwood, I was able to meet new people and explore and expand my new passions.

My favorite thing about Northwood is all the great and vastly unique people there. I met friends that I’ll love and remember for the rest of my life. My very small friend group is truly like family to me, and they tremendously helped me grow as an individual. (Thanks guys!) I hope to visit Lake Placid often as it’s one of my favorite places in the world.

Dispatch from South Korea: Su Hae “Jessica” Jang ‘20

Note: The Mirror’s editor-in-chief Su Hae “Jessica” Jang ‘20 has been home in South Korea since the pandemic led to all students departing campus in March. She shares her personal experience f the pandemic in this essay.

JESSICA (SU HAE) JANG ’20

Both South Korea and the United States confirmed their first cases of COVID-19 on the same day, January 20, 2020. Now, three months later, the U.S. has the highest number of confirmed cases and deaths in the world, whereas Korea has seen a sharp decline in the number of cases reported daily since its peak in late February. On April 19, Korea announced a single-digit number of new cases. How did Korea manage to flatten its curve?

On March 11, WHO, the World Health Organization, declared COVID-19 a pandemic. Later that day, Northwood ceased all on-campus programming and transitioned all instruction online. I had been expecting the news from some time before, as I had already witnessed my home country Korea experience the worst of the outbreak when the number of daily infections reached close to a thousand. Nevertheless, I was stunned and overwhelmed. As of March 12, Korea had about 8,000 total confirmed cases, while the States had less than a thousand. Does it make sense to leave a safer country to go back home where the virus poses a serious threat to public health? Should I pack everything in my dorm room just in case? Is it even possible to do so in less than two days without anyone’s help? What will happen to my family in Korea if I catch the virus at the airport on my way back home? Will I be able to handle online learning at home? (Korea is 13 hours ahead of the States.) What if I can’t come back for graduation? What about college? But I was most scared to find the answer to this: Will I ever see my friends and teachers at Northwood again?

Despite the numerous questions floating around in my head, I still believed, or at least hoped, that I would return to Northwood to celebrate the end of my high school career with my family and friends. So when I left Northwood, not knowing that I wouldn’t be able to set foot on campus for the next three months, I said neither “Goodbye” or “See you later” to my friends. Instead, I told them, “Have a nice spring break!”

But by the time I safely arrived home, the tables had turned. Americans watched the exponential growth in their number of new COVID-19 cases with growing alarm. Meanwhile, Korea, which has been a country with the second-highest infections after China, noticed its curve beginning to plateau. All of a sudden, Maybe I won’t be able to go back to the U.S. became I probably shouldn’t go back to the U.S.

Although Korea extended its social distancing measures until May 5, it has recently eased restrictions on shops, restaurants, religious services, and other facilities to allow local economies to recover from the pandemic. Yet I haven’t witnessed drastic changes in people’s lifestyles. We continue to wear masks at all times. Emergency text alerts continue to inform the routes of patients who have tested positive in the area we live in. (The patients remain anonymous.) All students, from elementary school to college, continue to take online classes at home.

What surprised me most about Korea’s response to the pandemic was the absence of any lockdowns. From lessons learned from the MERS outbreak in 2015, Korea was able to quickly contain the virus without restricting the movement of people. By tracking locations of phones, records of credit card transactions, and footages of surveillance cameras, health officials identified and tested people the patients had been in contact with. Once tested positive, the patients were promptly treated. This method of contact tracing, which is used only during disease outbreaks, along with the widespread availability of test kits, which were developed and distributed early on, and drive-through and walk-in testing centers allowed the testing of up to 140,000 samples a week. As of April 27, 601,660 tests have been performed.

Another striking aspect was the absence of hoarding. As I read “Week in Pictures: Pandemic Leads to Suspension of Campus Activities and Moves Classes Online” on The Mirror, I realized that Koreans, including myself, did not stockpile toilet paper, hand sanitizers, face masks, or any type of daily necessities. Before leaving the States, I had heard from my family and friends that they had to line up at pharmacies to buy masks and were allowed to purchase two per week. Now, I can buy up to three masks a week and check the number of available masks at nearby pharmacies with an app. Without panic buying, the public has managed to remain calm.

South Korea, my home country, has been maintaining a comparatively low fatality rate of 2.26%. As of April 27, there has been a total of 10,738 confirmed cases—8,764 have been released from quarantine, 1,731 are still isolated, and 243 have died. Only 10 new cases were added to the data on the 27th. Yet the United States, where I study and where my friends and teachers live, is experiencing a surge in new cases with 999,237 accumulated cases—137,243 have recovered, 56,173 have died.

As health officials around the world warn the possibility of a new wave of coronavirus outbreaks if vaccines are not developed soon, I hope everyone stays safe and healthy. I eagerly anticipate seeing my friends and teachers at Lake Placid sometime in the near future.

Second Trimester Honor Rolls Announced

honorrollMarch 11, 2020 — Dr. Laura Finnerty Paul, Northwood School’s Dean of Academic Affairs, today announced the Honor Rolls for the second trimester of the 2019-20 school year, which concluded on Thursday, February 13.

DEAN’S LIST
Upperclassmen (Gr. 11 & 12): Minimum weighted GPA of 4.00 with no grade below B+
Underclassmen (Gr. 9 & 10): Minimum weighted GPA of 3.70 with no grade below B+

  • Rintaro Akasaka ‘20
  • Amelia Brady ‘21
  • Katherine Broderick ‘22
  • Angelia Castillo ‘21
  • Ryan Cielo ‘21
  • Ellie Colby ‘21
  • Kira Cook ‘23
  • Nora Dawood ‘23
  • Ava Day ‘21
  • Peppi DelliQuadri ‘22
  • Norah Dempsey ‘21
  • Haley Donatello ‘21
  • Patrick Doyle ‘20
  • Zachary Ellsworth ‘20
  • Magdalena Erbenova ‘20
  • Courtney Fairchild ‘20
  • Aiden Ziyad Fakhuri ‘20
  • Ella Fesette ‘22
  • Lucas French ‘20
  • Caroline Harrison ‘22
  • Erin “Lexi” Hooper ‘20
  • Su Hae “Jessica” Jang ‘20
  • Jadenlin Klebba ‘21
  • Madison Kostoss ‘21
  • Jazlyn Lluberes ‘23
  • Anja Martin ‘22
  • Santiago Matheu ‘20
  • Andrew Mazza ‘21
  • Keith Mutunga ‘21
  • Christie-Ann Nelson ‘23
  • Iva-Amanda Nelson ‘23
  • Quy-An NguyenLe ‘21
  • Rowen Norfolk ‘22
  • Maximilian Oechsner ‘21
  • Mateo Rodriguez Cortina ‘20
  • Abigail Sinclair ‘23
  • Adria Tebo ‘23
  • Emilie Venne ‘20
  • Kara Wentzel ‘22
  • Zachary Zientko ‘21

 

HIGH HONOR ROLL
Upperclassmen (Gr. 11 & 12): Minimum weighted GPA of 3.70 with no grade below B
Underclassmen (Gr. 9 & 10): Minimum weighted GPA of 3.30 with no grade below B

  • Kendin Basden ‘22
  • Matthew Brady ‘22
  • Adelia Castillo ‘21
  • Gabby Cote ‘21
  • Maisie Crane ‘23
  • Cisco DelliQuadri ‘20
  • William Donato ‘21
  • Macie Eisenhart ‘23
  • Alvaro Galan Ortega ‘20
  • Christophe Garon ‘20
  • Kathryn Hagness ‘21
  • Carson Hall ‘22
  • Audrey Higgins-Lopez ‘21
  • Jacob Jaslow ‘23
  • Nathan Kirschenbaum ‘21
  • Lars Kroes ‘21
  • Hillary Larsen ‘22
  • Aidan Lasky ‘22
  • Junyeop Lee ‘23
  • Slater Loffredo ‘22
  • Ashlyn McGrath ‘21
  • Luc Mikula ‘21
  • Thebe Mosehathebe ‘23
  • Chase Ormiston ‘21
  • Santiago Perez Diosdado ‘22
  • Noah Pittman ‘21
  • Imani Rodriguez ‘20
  • William Rosen ‘20
  • Bernardo Simoes ‘20
  • Lily Spiegel ‘22
  • Marcelo Suarez Rojas ‘20
  • Braelyn Tebo ‘20
  • Mariema Thioubou ‘23
  • Johann Tremblay-Kau ‘22
  • Joey Winthrop ‘23
  • Hin Sum Wong ‘20

 

HONOR ROLL
Upperclassmen (Gr. 11 & 12): Minimum GPA of 3.30 with no grade below B-
Underclassmen (Gr. 9 & 10): Minimum GPA of 3.00 with no grade below B-

  • Marina Alvarez ‘21
  • Brian Bette ‘22
  • Tyler Boudreau ‘22
  • Matthew Burns ‘22
  • John Cielo ‘21
  • Cody Cleaveland ‘23
  • Daniel Colabufo ‘20
  • Connor DeAngelis ‘22
  • Benjamin DeGirolamo ‘21
  • Eli Jean-Francois ‘21
  • Jordan Harris ‘21
  • Aimee Headland ‘20
  • Rachel Hinkley ‘21
  • Olivia McLean ‘21
  • Brendan Merriman ‘21
  • Mark Monaco ‘21
  • Christopher “Kip” Morgan ‘20
  • Benjamin Norton ‘22
  • Madison Novotny ‘20
  • Ryan Panico ‘22
  • Marie-Jeanne Prince ‘22
  • Charles Purcell ‘21
  • Robert Renner ‘21
  • Tomas Restrepo Gaviria ‘20
  • Lucas Rodriguez Cortina ‘20
  • Eitan Rosen ‘20
  • Margot Rouquette ‘20
  • Jack Schlifke ‘20
  • Iliana Smith ‘22
  • Luke Smith ‘21
  • Hadley Swedlund ‘20
  • Chuer “Chloe” Zhang ‘21

 

EFFORT HONOR ROLL
Attained at least three “excellent” grades, with no effort grades below “good.”

  • Rintaro Akasaka ‘20
  • Amelia Brady ‘21
  • Matthew Brady ‘22
  • Katherine Broderick ‘22
  • Adelia Castillo ‘21
  • Angelia Castillo ‘21
  • John Cielo ‘21
  • Ryan Cielo ‘21
  • Daniel Colabufo ‘20
  • Ellie Colby ‘21
  • Kira Cook ‘23
  • Gabby Cote ‘21
  • Nora Dawood ‘23
  • Ava Day ‘21
  • Cisco DelliQuadri ‘20
  • Peppi DelliQuadri ‘22
  • Norah Dempsey ‘21
  • Haley Donatello ‘21
  • William Donato ‘21
  • Patrick Doyle ‘20
  • Macie Eisenhart ‘23
  • Zachary Ellsworth ‘20
  • Magdalena Erbenova ‘20
  • Courtney Fairchild ‘20
  • Aiden Ziyad Fakhuri ‘20
  • Ella Fesette ‘22
  • Lucas French ‘20
  • Alvaro Galan Ortega ‘20
  • Kathryn Hagness ‘21
  • Carson Hall ‘22
  • Caroline Harrison ‘22
  • Audrey Higgins-Lopez ‘21
  • Erin “Lexi”  Hooper ‘20
  • Su Hae “Jessica” Jang ‘20
  • Jacob Jaslow ‘23
  • Eli Jean-Francois ‘21
  • Jadenlin Klebba ‘21
  • Madison Kostoss ‘21
  • Lars Kroes ‘21
  • Hilary Larsen ‘22
  • Aidan Lasky ‘22
  • Junyeop Lee ‘23
  • Michael Leone ‘21
  • Jazlyn Lluberes ‘23
  • Elise Loescher ‘21
  • Slater Loffredo ‘22
  • Anja Martin ‘22
  • Santiago Matheu ‘20
  • Andrew Mazza ‘21
  • Olivia McLean ‘21
  • Brendan Merriman ‘21
  • Luc Mikula ‘21
  • Christopher “Kip” Morgan ‘20
  • Thebe Mosehathebe ‘23
  • Keith Mutunga ‘21
  • Christie-Ann Nelson ‘23
  • Iva-Amanda Nelson ‘23
  • Quy NguyenLe ‘21
  • Rowen Norfolk ‘22
  • Chase Ormiston ‘21
  • Santiago Perez Diosdado ‘22
  • Noah Pittman ‘21
  • Robert Renner ‘21
  • Imani Rodriguez ‘20
  • Lucas Rodriguez Cortina ‘20
  • Mateo Rodriguez Cortina ‘20
  • William Rosen ‘20
  • Margot Rouquette ‘20
  • Bernardo Simoes ‘20
  • Abigail Sinclair ‘23
  • Lily Spiegel ‘22
  • Marcelo Suarez Rojas ‘20
  • Hadley Swedlund ‘20
  • Braelyn Tebo ‘20
  • Mariema Thioubou ‘23
  • Johann Tremblay-Kau ‘22
  • Andrew Van Slyke ‘20
  • Emilie Venne ‘20
  • Kara Wentzel ‘22
  • Hin Sum Wong ‘20
  • Zachary Zientko ‘21
  • Jingyi Zuo ‘23

 

Huskies Have Strong Showing in Vex Robotics

IMG-6901

Last year in November, four beginners joined Northwood’s Robotics team. After two and a half months of designing and programming robots, they participated in the VEX Robotics Competition at Queensbury, NY. James Zuo ’23 and Tiago Pinto ’21 (Team #12946Y) finished 15th among 60 teams. Anja Martin ’22 and Quy-An “Q” NguyenLe ’23 (Team #12946Z) came in 7th overall. Northwood also placed 16th in the driver/programming skills challenge.

“We have well-designed robots for both teams. James recently added an innovative sliding system to lift his robot higher, and he is still building. Q and Anja just redesigned their claw. So the robots will keep getting better and better in between competitions,” said Mr. Jeff Martin, Department Chair of Innovation, Engineering, and Entrepreneurship (IEE). “James takes Computer Programming class and did most of the programming for both robots,” added Mr. Martin. His teammates were in co-curricular Robotics and worked on the robots twice a week.

Brain Bette ’22 coached both teams at the competition. He took Robotics class and competed at the VEX Robotics competition last year. This year, he not only helped everyone in his team cooperate but also encouraged his teammates to work with teams from other schools. “The coach’s job is to talk to the driver so that the driver doesn’t get tunnel vision and to find out other teams’ strategies, strengths, and weaknesses,” Mr. Martin said. “And Brian did just that.”

Although waitlisted for now, Northwood’s Robotics hopes to compete in state championships—perhaps even in world championships. Mr. Martin said, “I think we have enough accumulative points to make it to state championships.” And if they win state championships, they will head to Louisville, Kentucky for a global competition. Last year, Bette and Paul Han ’19 came in 8th place in states. Mr. Martin believes that with practice and commitment, the team can break last year’s record.

With the opening of the Innovation Hub fast-approaching, the team looks forward to the expansion of the Robotics program. “Robotics is open to anybody. Anybody who loves robots can come hang out at the Hub,” said Mr. Martin. He added, “Robotics is cool.”

If they make it to state championships, Northwood’s Robotics team will travel to Syracuse, NY on February 29th.

Alumni Exchange Gives Sneak Peak Into Innovation Hub

Alumni

Are you a Northwood alum who wants updates on the school but can’t visit campus? If so, here’s a simple way to connect with your alma mater: click on a link and log in with your webcam to interact with Head of School Mr. Maher and other alumni.

Jang alumni

Mirror editor-in-chief Su Hae Jang ’20 reporting on the first Alumni Exchange with Mr. Micael Maher in October 2019 (Photo: Northwood School).

Launched by the Alumni Council on October 2nd, 2019, the Alumni Exchange is an opportunity for Northwood’s 3,200 alums to exchange ideas and ask questions about the school. All alumni are invited via email, and anyone willing to participate may also use the link posted on Northwood’s Facebook page. “We haven’t done an alumni magazine in a number of years, so it’s a creative way for the school to communicate and share news from campus with our alumni,” said Ms. Stephanie Colby, Assistant Director of Development.

Tonight at 7:30 PM, Associate Head of School Mr. Tom Broderick will host a virtual town-hall-style meeting at the Innovation Hub. The Advancement Office expects to hold another Alumni Exchange in the spring.

To get an exclusive preview of the Innovation Hub tonight, use this link to join the Alumni Exchange: https://bit.ly/2RxaNUq

Main Street Innovation Hub Now Set to Open in February

The opening of Northwood’s new downtown Lake Placid location, the Innovation Hub at Northwood School, is now set to open after Winter Break. The new academic center, originally scheduled to open in the fall (and then after Christmas break), has had its grand opening date changed due to normal construction delays. As the construction team adds final touches to the new facility, all classes will remain at Northwood’s main campus until classes resume after break on February 24.

As an extension to the main campus, the Innovation Hub will expand Northwood’s interdisciplinary approach to learning to downtown Lake Placid and beyond. The Innovation Hub will host a variety of programs to foster collaboration within the Northwood community. Student Exchange will encourage Northwood students to share their talents in events including but not limited to poetry slams, open mic nights, and music concerts. Through Alumni Exchange, the alumni will also have chances to further connect with their alma mater. Head of School, Mr. Michael Maher, and the Alumni Council will regularly present virtual town-hall-style conferences to discuss the visions of Northwood.

The Innovation Hub will be an opportunity to open Northwood’s doors to the local community as well. Community Exchange events, such as lecture series, mentorship meetings, and educational workshops, will promote both the student body and the regional community members to share their knowledge and experiences. Hub Talks is another program to look forward to. These events will host top-level speakers and will be recorded for those who cannot attend. Information on summer camps and auxiliary programs will follow.

A Community Open House at the Innovation Hub is planned for Monday, February 24 from 4:00 – 7:00 pm. Members of the Northwood and Lake Placid communities are welcome to stop by and explore the new space.

Members of the Northwood community with ideas and questions should send a message to innovationhub@northwoodschool.com.

 

Get to Know Mr. Keanu Hilaire

Keanu Hilaire joins Northwood as an instructor in the Math Department and will be helping with the robotics program. He will also work as an Assistant Coach for the Boys’ Prep Hockey team.  Keanu grew up in Montreal and attended Kent School for three years. He graduated from Williams College where he double majored in Computer Science and French and was the Captain of the Varsity Men’s Hockey Team.

That was the brief description of new teacher Mr. Keanu Hilaire on Northwood’s home page. The Mirror‘s editor-in-chief Su Hae Jang ’20 tried to get to know him a little better and filed this report.

Keanu

Mr. Keanu Hilair (Photo: Mr. Michael Aldridge).

Tell me a little about yourself. 

I’m from Montreal, Canada. I currently live on Second East on campus.

I teach Pre-Calculus and Robotics at Northwood. Both of these are interesting fields of study for me because I studied Computer Science in college. I see Pre-Calc as the beginning of the harder type of math. A lot of students decide whether they like math or not in this course, so I think it’s a really important class to teach. But it’s also a lot of fun because math gets more interesting in Pre-Calc.

Northwood is a familiar environment for me. As a high schooler, I went to a prep school in Connecticut called Kent School. My college was also a very small college with only about 2,200 students. I love tight-knit communities because I feel like what I do matters. After graduation, a lot of my friends went to work for big companies, but I think that those places can sometimes make you feel like a small fish in a big pond. In a place like Northwood, I see the direct impact of what I’m doing. I think that’s important.

How did you first learn about Northwood? Why did you decide to come here?

Every time I drove down to school from Montreal, I saw the sign for Lake Placid. I visited Lake Placid a couple of times because it’s a beautiful and historic place. I was a hockey player in college, so I learned about Northwood from a couple of my friends who had played hockey here. I also had some alumni connections with the school from my college.

When you first got here, what was your first impression of Northwood? Has it changed?

During my orientation, which was before students got to campus, I thought Northwood as a nice, little, quiet, secluded place. Now I know that Northwood is actually a vibrant and exciting place. Everybody is here, and our whole community is together.

How is Northwood similar or different from the schools you attended?

Northwood is a little bit more secluded than schools in big cities, and we have the beautiful outdoors. We can see the stars at night. These aspects of a small community were similar in other places I’ve been to.

However, Northwood is also a little bit different from my elementary school and where I went to for my first four years of high school. I was in Montreal, which is more of a big city with lots of people. Cities have their own type of energy, but sometimes living in one can be a little overwhelming.

How do you expect to expand your hockey career here at Northwood? Are there any differences between being a player and being a coach?

It’s difficult being a coach when you’ve played for so long. You miss that rush you feel when you’re playing on the ice. But I think what’s going to push me forward in my hockey career right now is passing on the knowledge and experience to students who want to get further in hockey and have the same passion in the sport as I do.

What was your favorite day at Northwood so far? What challenges have you faced at Northwood so far?

I also liked Mountain Day, but my favorite day was definitely the first day of classes. Orientation kicked off my career at Northwood, but the first day of classes was what told me that I could do well this year.

I think the biggest challenge for me has been managing my time and workload. I need to make sure that I get work back to my students, go to practice on time, and so on. I don’t think you can get ready for everything that gets thrown at you in a place like this. And I think we all face the same challenges in terms of schedule. We all try to be on time, but the management of both time and work has been difficult. But we’re getting there.

Northwood Expands Composting Program

Compost

Su Hae (Jessica) Jang ‘20 and Imani Hawman ‘20 with a bucket of kitchen waste headed to the composter (Photo: Mr. Tyler Eaton).

Two years ago, two freshmen began transforming food waste from the school kitchen into natural fertilizer for the garden on campus. Collaborating with the kitchen staff, the girls composted two five-gallon buckets of food scraps per week using a small compost tumbler adjacent to the school greenhouse. By their second year at Northwood, they had built an outdoor three-bin composting system behind the Friedlander science building and were composting about 70 to 80 gallons of organic waste every week.

As they begin their senior year, Su Hae (Jessica) Jang ‘20 and Imani Hawman ‘20 look forward to expanding the composting program at Northwood through the giant drum composter behind the Shipman Youth Center here in Lake Placid. “Northwood produces about 40 to 180 pounds of organic waste a day. The three-bin composting system didn’t have the capacity to handle all of that” said Jang, the President of Northwood’s Sustainability Committee. “Now that we have a new composter in town, we’ll be able to compost all of the food waste from the school kitchen and the dining hall, including bones, meat, oils, veggies, what have you,” she added.

The new composting machine is one of the three replicas of a model composter that was built at North Country School three years ago. Funded by the New York State Energy Research and Development Authority’s Cleaner, Greener Communities (CGC) Program, North Country School installed three additional composters this summer–one of each at Lake Placid Central School, Hermon De-Kalb Central School in St. Lawrence County, and The Wild Center, a natural history museum in Tupper Lake. Each composter can handle an input of 300 pounds of food waste each day, year-round.

Northwood was the first to partner with Lake Placid High School. Last Friday, on September 13th, Mr. Tyler Eaton, the faculty advisor of the Sustainability Committee, added the first buckets of food waste along with wood pellets to the composting facility. “The cost is $0.10 per pound of waste, the same cost for waste at the Town of North Elba Transfer Station,” Mr. Eaton said. “Since the Committee will be diverting all food waste from the back of the school kitchen, composting two to three times per week, Northwood’s trash dumpster size and pick-up schedule should decrease.”

As the teacher of Environmental Science at Northwood, Mr. Eaton thinks that students can further the composting efforts on campus by designing an independent study focusing on the impact of composting on sustainability. “It seems feasible that we create a course for composting. We could use half of that course time for actual composting, and use the other half to do some independent research, whether it might be research into the economic side, the environmental carbon footprint side, or the social aspect side of composting. A designated period for the course would be nice to get our compost transported multiple times a week,” said Mr. Eaton. He continued, “The course could be cool, interactive, and hands-on learning, and, at the same time, count toward hours of independent study.”

The problem remaining for the Sustainability Committee and the Northwood community is the lack of student volunteers to transport kitchen compost to the drum composter in town. “We need to find a way to involve more students. Right now, we need at least three volunteers who are willing to transport our food waste to the composter in one of their free periods,” Jang said. “This is a fantastic opportunity for us to compost organic waste locally, engage students, partner with the local community, all while decreasing the school’s carbon footprint. If you have any questions or concerns, please don’t hesitate to reach out to me,” said Jang.

New Play Explores “One of the Most Relevant Issues of Our Time”

NOTE: dues to a coming snowstorm, performances dates and times have changed. Showtimes are now Wednesday, February 13 at 7 pm and Thursday, February 14 at 10 am.

Anonymous poster FINAL

On Wednesday, February 13th, Northwood Drama presents Naomi Iizuka’s Anon(ymous) at the Lake Placid Center for the Arts. As a modern retelling of Homer’s “The Odyssey,” the play tells the story a young refugee called Anon is separated from his mother and journeys through the United States, encountering a wide variety of people — some kind, some dangerous and cruel — as he searches for his family. From a sinister one-eyed butcher to beguiling barflies to a sweatshop, Anon must navigate through a chaotic, ever-changing landscape in this entrancing adaptation of Homer’s Odyssey. [Read more…]

Head of The Fish Regatta a “Mixed Bag” For Crew Team

On the last weekend of October, Northwood’s crew team traveled to Saratoga Springs, NY to compete in the Head of the Fish hosted by the Saratoga Rowing Association. With over 2,100 entries and 170 clubs participating in the event, rowers from across the northeastern region the country, including the Huskies, assembled on Fish Creek despite the miserable weather. Coach H. Runyon said, “The Head of the Fish, for us, is a race where we hope to put together puzzle pieces we’ve been working on throughout the fall season. These include skill pieces, fitness pieces, and racing knowledge pieces.” [Read more…]

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